03/23/2011

Remote Rig system, actual setup:


I started using the Remote Rig system in the spring of 2010. They had just been made available in the US and Mikael was running his first ad in QST.

I purchased the pair and set them up with a Kenwood TS 480 that I had. (By the way, the Kenwood TS 480's are the best radio to pair with the RRC system)

I had lots of problems over the next two weeks....I swapped many emails with Mikael in Sweden. He was great...I don't think he sleeps. He was very understanding. His instructions documents were not very good and as I figured things out I would send him my notes. He commented that the simple things for him seemed to be most difficult for others. (Being a genius probably helps).

Over time his instructions and his web site have become vastly better. It still helps if you have some background in computer networking or have a friend that you can call.

I will include some of my notes below since they still might be of some help to someone

Setting up the RRC remote boxes….Notes from Ron KY6N, 04/2010

Please let me know if there are any errors in my instructions….ron@ky6n.com

The intent of this installation is to eliminate the computer from the remote end and use just the RRC boxes connected by the internet.

Step one………Out of the box:

A basic issue that must be addressed is to get both the computer and the RRC boxes into the same network “neighborhood”. The boxes that I received were set to 192.168.0.227 and 228. My computer network was set up to find devices connected to it only in the 192.168.1.xxx “neighborhood”. The difference is the .0 or the .1 in the addresses. If the computer is set to .1 and the devices are set to .0 the computer can’t find it.

To find out what your computer is set to….

Open Network Connections on the computer

Right click on “Local Area Connections”

Select “Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) in the Connection Properties box

Click the “Properties” box/button

The first line “IP address” will show a number like 192.168.1.161

The 1 indicates what “neighborhood” the computer is set to.

The RRC boxes must have the same “neighborhood” address.

Each device will have a unique address….being the last three digits. The RRC boxes come with 227 and 228. I found no reason to change this.

However, I did have to change the 0 to 1 to them in agreement with my computer.

If your computer is already set to 0; there is no need to go through this process.

The easy way to change the RRC boxes is to access them via their serial port and use Hyperterm or some similar program to go in and change their internal settings to .1 from the factory .0. A more complicated alternative is to change your computer from .1 to .0 ….then access the RRC box and change it to .1 and then change the compute back to .1

After this is settled you should be able to access the RRC box using the USB or Ethernet connection by typing the address with the port number into your browser address line i.e. http://192.168.1.227:8000/

Where 8000 is the port number assigned to the Web server port in the Advanced Settings area of the RRC box.

To do initial testing I set up the entire system in the same room, using the local area network.

This way all of the “bugs” can be worked out without traveling to and from a remote site or requiring two people for testing. All settings, shown below for an actual remote location are all in the local area network “neighborhood” such as 192.168.1.227 etc.

To view the following settings in your browser via the Ethernet connection:

Type http://192.168.1.227:8000/ into your browser address line.

Note, I use port 8000 instead of 80. The default is 80.

To access the Radio end (remote) RRC box from your local (control end) computer; type http://xx.xxx.xxx.xx:8000/ or the DyDns wild card address plus port number into your browser address line.

Note again I use port 8000 instead of the default of 80.

The IP address is the outside IP address assigned by your service provider at your Radio location. You can also use your DynDns wild card address and port number such as http://www. radio.homeip.net:8000/

Settings at the radio end:

I.P. Settings:

Unit ID RRC 1258 Radio

DHCP No

I.P. 192.168.1.228

Net Mask 255.255.255.0

Gateway: 192.168.1.1 (which is my router address)

Dyns Server 192.168.1.1 (Router address)

Ext IP/ Host xx.xxx.xxx.xx (External IP address from service provider)

Eth-type Auto

Web page usr Blank

Web page pw Blank

Radio settings:

Program Mode 5-TS480

Sip Password Blank in my case

Sip Realm Blank in my case

Audio Quality 2-Linear 16bit 8khz

Codec out gain 255

Codec inp gain 0

Com0 baudrate 57600

Com0 data bits 8

Com0 stop bits 1

Com0 parity 0-off

DynDns settings:

DynDns check interval 10

DynDns host name your choice

IP check host name checkip.dyndns.org

Own host name your choice

Usr name your choice

Password your choice

Serial Settings:

Com1 Mode 3 Set for SPE linear 1K FA

Com1 baudrate 9600

Com1 Data bits 8

Com1 Stop bits 1

Com1 parity 0-off

Com1 rts/cts yes

Com1 Terminator mode 0d where 0 is zero

Com2…..not used at this time.

Advanced settings:

UDP cmd port 12000

UDP audio port 11000

SIP port 5060

Web server port 8000

Telnet server port 23

Rx jitter buffer size 4

Rx jitter delay 3

Audio packet size 20

Continuous RTP tx No

Debug level Off

DynDns settings:

DynDns check interval 10

DynDns host name sample.homeip.net ( this is the address of my local computer)

IP check host name checkup.dyndns.org

Own host name sample.homeip.net (this is the IP address of the remote)

Username xxxxxxx (master account user name for DynDns account)

Password xxxxxx (master account password for DynDns account)

Keyer Settings: No changes made


Settings at the Control end:

I.P. Settings:

Unit ID Anything, just text

DHCP No

I.P. 192.168.1.227 (the address of this device)

Netmask 255.255.255.0

Gateway: 192.168.1.1 (address of the local router)

Dns server 192.168.1.1 (address of the local router)

These may differ with your setup.

Extern IP/Host Blank

Eth-type Auto

Web page user Blank

Web page pwd Blank

Radio Settings:

Program mode 5 TS480

Sip Password Blank….in my case

Sip Contact: sample.homeip.net

Audio quality 2-linear 16 bit 8kHz

Codec out gain 255

Codec input gain 18

Com0 baudrate 57600

Com0 data bits 8

Com0 stop bits 1

Com0 Parity 0-off

Serial Settings:

Com1 Mode 3 Set for SPE linear 1K FA

Com1 baudrate 9600

Com1 Data bits 8

Com1 Stop bits 1

Com1 parity 0-off

Com1 rts/cts yes

Com1 Terminator mode 0d where 0 is zero

Com2 not in use at this location.

Advanced settings:

UDP cmd port 12000

UDP audio port 11000

SIP port 5060

Web server port 8000

Telnet server port 23

Rx jitter buffer size 4

Rx jitter delay 3

Audio packet size 20

Continuous RTP tx No

Debug level Off

DynDns settings None at this location

Keyer settings Factory defaults

Opening ports on your router:

You must open several ports and set port forwarding on the router at the Radio (remote) location:

I use a LinkSys WRT 54g at the remote site. Other brands of routers have a similar setting page.

The port forwarding programming area in the WRT54g is located under the Gaming/Applications tab in the router.

Settings would be:

Application Start End Protocol IPaddress Enable

TelNet /SIP2 23 23 TCP 192.168.1.227 Check

WbSvr/DynDns 8000 8000 TCP 192.168.1.228 Check

SIP 5060 5060 UDP 192.168.1.228 Check

RTP/RRC 11000 11000 UDP 192.168.1.228 Check

RRC1 12000 12000 UDP 192.168.1.228 Check

Note: I moved the port 80 function to port 8000. To use the RRC boxes with the factory defaults, enter port 80 and not 8000.

Additional notes:

The Windows firewall setting does not effect the operation of the RRC box. Nothing is going thru the computer if you are using direct RRC box to RRC box.(no computer needed at the remote end).

I had a problem with RF interference getting into the transmitted audio while testing. The problem turned out to be that I was using the same power supply for the Radio end RRC box and the Radio….. The radio and the radio end RRC unit must NOT share the same power supply.

Also don’t leave the USB cable connected to either box when transmitting.

This seems to cause distorted audio on the transmit signal also.

Below are some notes from Mikael:

Firewalls

(updated 09-11-29)

One of the major obstacles when trying to remotely control something is the fact that the Internet Service Provider (ISP) forces us to use dynamic IP addresses. We can never know, from time to time, which IP address our 'modem' / firewall / router has on its outside interface (the IP address you will try to connect to). Most people use NAT routers that translates IP addresses on the inside (your little LAN) to one common IP address on the outside using Port conversion.

To be able to stream audio and at the same time transfer CAT / CI-V commands or 'panel to radio communications' we need to know which IP port numbers are used for each service. There are some different techniques to fix this.

At the operator end (or panel) there is normally OK just to use DHCP in the RRC-1258MkII. You need to set the IP adress or DNS-name to the Radio RRC.

At the radio end the router must be configured in a way so port 5060, 11000 and 12000 (programmable) is directed to the radio RRC-1258MkII which should have a static IP address. The easy way to get connected is to set the RRC:s IP address as DMZ server in the router. This makes it possible to connect to all services (SIP, audio and control) as well as the web and telnet interfaces without further configuration. This is OK if you don't run a web server at home or if you are using SIP based IP telephony. If that is the case you need to change the port settings in both RRC:s and configure the router in a way that every service forwards packets to the right host on the inside.

You will also need to register the radio end RRC to DynDNS or a similar service so you can use a host name to connect to the remote RRC regardless of its dynamic IP address (which can change without notice, but rarely does). The RRC_1258MkII has a built in DynDNS Client see Common config.

The following IP ports are used (default and changeable)

5060 = SIP ( change in both ends if you already using SIP based IP-telephony)

11000 = RTP (audio)

12000 = Data channel, control commands

80 = WEB interface

23 = Telnet Interface

SIP, RTP and DATA protocols are UDP-based , WEB and Telnet are TCP-based.